Recovery Help Now | Raising Your Vibration and Release Anger by Elana Clark-Faler, LCSW
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Raising Your Vibration and Release Anger by Elana Clark-Faler, LCSW

You can live in a world of peace, love and cooperation.  It’s happening now.  I know it’s hard to see in this political climate.  I see people taking action to change.  Clients come every day to my office desiring and seeking to change.  I see a strong desire from others to live a rich and meaningful life.  I have hope and faith that we are living in a new world where we are seeking to vibrate at a higher level.  Many people are standing up and desiring to be a better person by letting go of hate and anger. 

You live in a rich and abundant universe where there is help and resources everywhere to develop skills to change.  The light workers are here to help individuals heal from pain and transfer anger into love energy.  Make a choice to let go of resentment and anger.  Make a decision to be a leader of peace, love and joy.  Anger is a low vibrational emotional energy.  It can bring disease and cancers.  It spreads and hurts your organs and negatively affects the environment around you.  I don’t think it’s a coincidence that Step 4 of the 12 steps is focused on removing resentment.  It’s often the reason people drink, to escape from an emotion or situation.  When you stop an addiction of any sort, you chose to face your life and address your anger. 

Real change is learning to live in your integrity.  To be yourself.  It might rub people the wrong way or it actually may uplift or shift someone’s perspective.  We are meant to be ourselves and not let external circumstance move us away from joy.  It’s time to heal and dissolve anger and hate. 

Start with yourself, transfer anger into love energy.  Make a decision to be curious, instead of jumping to conclusions or taking things personally.  Ask the following:

  • Why is this happening?
  • Am I seeing the situation from all sides?
  • Are there other ways I can respond?
  • What am I feeling and why do you feel so strongly about this right now?
  • What cord got struck?
  • What are my options and what are the possible consequences of each?
  • Can I relinquish control?  What would that look like?
  • Is it a big deal?
  • What lessons am I learning right now?

Obviously, when you’re angry it’s hard to ask questions.  That’s why it might be important to write.  Take yourself out of the situation and let the pen flow with your words.  Obtain a journal and call it your resentment dumping ground.  Get the feelings out on the pages.  

Write the following:

  • Who am I angry with and what did this person do?
  • What was my response and what are the feelings that got triggered?
  • What did I make up about myself?  What stories did I make up about myself (ex., “I’m not worthy.” “I’m not good enough.”)?  What story did you make up about your worth?
  • And lastly, what was my part?

Then forgive yourself and the other person.  Transfer your anger to compassion for yourself and the other person.  Practice empathy and love.  Let it go.  

Elana Clark-Faler
elana@recoveryhelpnow.com