Recovery Help Now | Spring and Renewal of Relationships by Kris Winslow, LMFT
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Spring and Renewal of Relationships by Kris Winslow, LMFT

 

14995619_sAs we all process this lovely time change, we can be mindful of the signs around us that spring is coming. Leaves are growing, new flowers are blooming, and animals are vocally letting it be known they are intending to procreate. Especially my neighbor’s cats. As opposed to the the bleak time of year when we focus on the New Year’s Resolution, spring is a time of renewal and can be a time where we can focus a little more on our relationships.

None of the following information is meant to be profound, but is just written to maybe provoke a thought or start a conversation between partners. Sometimes the smallest thoughts can bloom into much bigger changes, as is the intent of spring itself.

  • ●  Make sure you are appreciating each other. Daily. There should be at least as many pleases and thank yous coming out of your mouth for your partner as for strangers or people at work.
  • ●  Make time for each other. Whatever that may look like. A 20 minute conversation at the end of a long day can sometimes mean more than hours of shared time that includes electronics.
  • ●  What did you used to enjoy doing together? Even a trip to a fast food restaurant can be fun if it creates a sense of nostalgia for the both of you.
  • ●  Learn something together. It can create a whole new dynamic in the relationship.
  • ●  Get away. Anywhere where nobody has to worry about household chores or paying the bills. It can be a hotel with a pool less than an hour from home as long as no one has tocook dinner or do laundry.
  • ●  Give of yourself without the expectation of receiving. Not all the time, but when you’re inthe right frame of mind, it’s nice.
  • ●  Don’t be mean. You know exactly what I’m talking about and what you shouldn’t be saying to your partner. Just make the extra effort to stop.
  • ●  Don’t rely on your partner to make changes. We can’t control other people, and change has to start somewhere.
  • ●  What do you like about your partner? Start focusing on that and not what they’re like after a Los Angeles commute.
  • ●  Have fun, even if you have to schedule it.

 

Elana Clark-Faler
elana@recoveryhelpnow.com